Table of Contents

of

Lieb, Hans-Heinrich. 1983b.
Integrational Linguistics.
Vol. I: General Outline.
Amsterdam; Philadelphia: Benjamins.
(= Current Issues in Linguistic Theory 17).

Lieb (1983b)
Dedication
Acknowledgements
General preface
    1    History of IL
    2    Reception of IL
    3    Contents of Volumes I to VI
    4    Concluding remarks
Table of contents
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0    Introduction
        0.1    Why "integrational linguistics"?
        0.2    Four theses on theories of language and theories of grammars
                 0.2.1    Theses 1 and 2
                 0.2.2    Theses 3 and 4
        0.3    Remarks on the theory of language systems
                 0.3.1    Language variability and the theory of language systems
                 0.3.2    Linguistic basis of the theory of language systems
        0.4    Remarks on the theory of grammars
        0.5    General remarks on Volume I
                 0.5.1    Relation to subsequent volumes
                 0.5.2    Treatment of linguistic literature
                 0.5.3    Degree of formality
                 0.5.4    Status of linguistic examples
PART A
LANGUAGES AND IDIOLECTS
1    Languages and their systems
        1.1    On the subject matter of a theory of language
        1.2    Remarks on the present theory
        1.3    On the concept of language
        1.4    Languages in time
        1.5    Systems in time
        1.6    The problem of abstraction
2    Idiolects and their systems
        2.1    Communication by means of idiolects
        2.2    The internal basis for idiolects
        2.3    Idiolects and social aspects
        2.4    Idiolect systems
        2.5    Idiolect systems and a theory of language systems
PART B
OUTLINE OF SYNTAX
3    Basic approach (1): A surface syntax for semantics
        3.1    The concept of a surface syntax as a basis for semantics
        3.2    Lexical meanings and syntactic autonomy
        3.3    Remarks on recent research
4    Basic approach (2): Syntactic structures and syntactic functions
        4.1    The formal status of syntactic functions
        4.2    The problem of basic functions
        4.3    Syntactic functions as a basis for meaning composition
        4.4    Syntactic structures
        4.5    Comments on syntactic structures and syntactic functions
        4.6    Remarks on grammatical relations in recent research
5    Syntactic structures (1): The constituent structure component
        5.1    Syntactic base forms and syntactic units
        5.2    Comments
        5.3    Constituent categories and constituent structures
        5.4    Comments on constituent categories
        5.5    Comments on constituent structures
6    Syntactic structures (2): Paradigms and syntactic marking categories
        6.1    Type 1 marking categories
        6.2    Comments
        6.3    Paradigms and words. Type 2 marking categories
        6.4    Comments
7    Syntactic structures (3): The marking structure component
        7.1    Examples of markings
        7.2    Markings and marking structures
        7.3    Comments
        7.4    Marking structures and constituent structures
8    Syntactic structures (4): Intonation structures. The structure assignment
        8.1    Syntactic intonation structures
        8.2    Comments
        8.3    Intonation structures and constituent and marking structures
        8.4    The syntactic structure assignment. Grammaticality and meaningfulness
9    Constituent functions, category functions, accents
        9.1    Constituent functions: examples
        9.2    Comments
        9.3    Complement and modifier. Functional ambiguity
        9.4    Non-constituent and non-immediate parts of constituent relations
        9.5    Dependent and independent parts
        9.6    Category functions
        9.7    The syntactic function sets. Accents as syntactic functions
PART C
OUTLINE OF MORPHOLOGY
10    Basic approach. Pure morphological constituent structures
        10.1    Basic approach
        10.2    Morphs
        10.3    Units and constituent structures
        10.4    Comments on constituent categories
        10.5    Stems and the distinction of basic vs. derived constituent categories
11    Pure morphological marking structures and morphological intonation structures
        11.1    Type 1 marking categories
        11.2    Morphological paradigms and lexemes
        11.3    Examples of stem and affix lexemes
        11.4    Markings of primitive constituents: Examples
        11.5    Markings and pure morphological marking structures
        11.6    Intonation structures
12    Morphological structures and morphological functions
        12.1    Morphological structures: pure, mixed, and general
        12.2    Morphological functions
        12.3    Meaning dependence of functions: Example
        12.4    Discussion
        12.5    Morphological accent
        12.6    The morphological function set
        12.7    Links between the morphological and syntactic parts
PART D
OUTLINE OF MORPHOSEMANTICS
13    Lexical meanings
        13.1    Introduction
        13.2    Perceptions, conceptions, concepts
        13.3    Lexical meanings as concepts
        13.4    Comments
14    The basis for morphosemantic meaning composition
        14.1    Lexical meanings in morphology
        14.2    Paradigm interpretation and morphosemantic interpretations
        14.3    Examples of morphosemantic functions: The bar1 functions in German
        14.4    bar2 to bar5 functions
        14.5    Morphological and morphosemantic functions 
15    Morphosemantic meaning composition
        15.1    Application conditions
        15.2    Multiplicity of semantic functions
        15.3    Multiplicity and the concept of function interpretation
        15.4    The morphological function interpretation: Definitions
        15.5    Comments
        15.6    Determination of morphological constituent meanings
PART E
OUTLINE OF SYNTACTIC SEMANTICS (1): SYNTACTIC MEANINGS
16    Lexical meanings in syntax
        16.1    Morphosemantic sources of lexical meanings in syntax
        16.2    The syntactic paradigm interpretation. Lexical meanings of syntactic units and paradigms
        16.3    Lexical interpretations
        16.4    Motivation for morpholexical interpretations
        16.5    Morpholexical interpretations
17    Sentence meanings
        17.1    Components of sentence meanings: Examples
        17.2    Attitude/content pairs
        17.3    The concept of sentence meaning
        17.4    Pure and mixed sentence meanings. Sentence meanings and normal utterances
        17.5    Components of simple sentence meanings
18    Referential meanings and reference bases
        18.1    Referential meanings: Example
        18.2    The concept of referential meaning
        18.3    Comments on referential meanings
        18.4    The concept of reference basis
        18.5    Reference bases as momentary universes of discourse
19    Basic, intermediate, and complete syntactic meanings
        19.1    The conception of basic syntactic meanings
        19.2    Definition of "basic syntactic meaning"
        19.3    Comments
        19.4    The concept of intermediate syntactic meaning
        19.5    Comments
        19.6    Syntactic meanings: complete and incomplete, pure and mixed
PART F
OUTLINE OF SYNTACTIC SEMANTICS (2): MEANING COMPOSITION
20    Intermediate syntactic meanings
        20.1    Example of an intermediate meaning
        20.2    Constructing the meaning: Concept formation
        20.3    Constructing the meaning: Contextual setting
        20.4    Type 1 semantic functions
        20.5    Constructing an intermediate meaning by type 2 functions
        20.6    Type 2 semantic functions
        20.7    Accounting for empty basic meanings
21    Predication bases
        21.1    Parts of a rhema: Example
        21.2    On constructing a predication base
        21.3    Auxiliary functions
        21.4    Perfect-tense predication base
        21.5    Verb form category and category interpretations
22    Predication bases and semantic roles
        22.1    Two theses on roles and role relations
        22.2    Roles, role relations, and meaning composition
        22.3    Verb form complements and role relations
        22.4    The proper treatment of roles and role relations
23    Predication
        23.1    The structure of predication: Example
        23.2    Elementary logical functions
        23.3    Open and weak existential predication
        23.4    Weak and strong existential predication
24    Predication, negation, and accents
        24.1    Examples of neg occurrences
        24.2    Predication and semantic negation
        24.3    Comments
        24.4    Ambiguous neg and accent occurrences
        24.5    Semantic interaction of neg occurrences and accent occurrences
25    Potential rhemata and potential rhematic background
        25.1    Rhematic relations and potential rhemata
        25.2    Construction of a non-predicational rhematic relation
        25.3    Comments
        25.4    Construction of potential rhemata
        25.5    Directive relations and rhematic pairs
        25.6    Potential background elements, background sets, and backgrounds
        25.7    Constructing background elements
26    Referential meanings and potential thematic parts
        26.1    Preliminaries
        26.2    Constructing existential-doxastic readings
        26.3    Two alternative bases for referential readings
        26.4    Referential meanings as permissible referential readings
        26.5    Referential meanings and potential rhemata
        26.6    Referential meanings and conditions of use
        26.7    Potential thematic parts
27    The construction of sentence meanings
        27.1    Potential component sequences and simple sentence meanings
        27.2    Determination of simple sentence meanings
        27.3    Example. The notion of component sequence
        27.4    The syntactic function interpretation: Intermediate and referential meanings
        27.5    The syntactic function interpretation: Rhematic and directive relations,
                   background elements and sets
        27.6    Accounting for arbitrary sentence meanings
        27.7    The problems of truth, textual meanings, metaphor, and semantics vs. pragmatics
PART G
INTEGRATIONAL GRAMMARS
28    Theory integration (1): Theories of language; grammars of languages
        and varieties
        28.1    The problem of theory integration in linguistics
        28.2    Theories of language and grammars of languages: Presupposition
        28.3    Theories of language, grammars of languages, grammars of language varieties:
                   Formulation-in-terms-of
        28.4    Linguistic theories of the same type: Conflation
29    Theory integration (2): Idiolect grammars; non-linguistic theories
        29.1    Idiolect grammars
        29.2    Non-linguistic theories
        29.3    The place of a theory of communication.  Summary of results on theory integration
30    Integrational grammars as axiomatic theories
        30.1    Theories of language, grammars of languages and varieties
        30.2    Idiolect grammars as applied theories
        30.3    The key sentences of a grammar
        30.4    Three general problems solved by integrational grammars
        30.5    The problem of interpretation
Bibliographies
    List of references
    Bibliography of Integrational Linguistics
Indexes
    Index of names
    Index of extratheoretical terms and subjects
    Index of theoretical terms and subjects
Lists
    Notational conventions
    List of symbols
    List of variables
    List of constants